John Butler Trio: Revolution

~♫~ So tell me family now what do you think? 
Watch it all go in the great big sink. 
Watch how the scum it rises to the top. 
Don’t you wonder when it’s all gonna stop? 
Sometimes I wonder how we do sleep, 
serving the dodgy companies we keep. 
All kicking and scrounging for the very first place – dictionary definition of a rat race. 
Pay off those losers we elect to lead, 
stealing from the mouths that we’re meant to feed. Enslaving the very clothes upon my back, 
I feel the sting but I hear no crack, no crack,
I’m saying 

Running through the fire, running through the flame, running through the hatred, pushing through the blame, running through the hopelessness and shame, 
revolution already underway…

Big Heavy Pirates man digging those holes, 
messing with something that they can’t control. Trespassing lands where they don’t belong, 
all I hear is screaming where there once were songs. 
I got my brothers they’re fighting those wars, 
fighting over scraps and scraping their sores. 
Under a blanket of a fire and pride that can’t keep us warm for the cold inside, inside,
I’m saying 

So tell me when you think we’re gonna rise? 
Wake from this slumber wipe the tears from our eyes? Yes from this nightmare yes I must now wake, 
open my fist my destiny I take! 
Good people sick and tired of being pushed around, 
we call them kings but I see no crown. 
Tell me when you think we’ll just stand up? 
Saying enough is enough is enough, enough,
I’m saying

 Take back your feet, take back your hands, 
take back your words, take back your land. 
Take back your heart, take back your pride, 
don’t got to run, don’t got to hide.

♫~ Revolution! ~♫

The Horizon Of Our Dreams

TEDx - “Fifty years from now, will we have destroyed the world? Or saved it? It’s not too soon to ask. Little more than 100 years ago, the mundane acts of our 21st Century daily life were strictly the purview of the gods: To take flight and traverse a continent in just hours…To splash daylight across a massive arena on a moonless night with the touch of one finger…

“The more god-like we’ve become, the more our humility is affected.” And if we don’t give serious thought to our trajectory as a global society, if we spend too much time looking backward nostalgically rather than ahead thoughtfully, we will succumb to ourselves. Because, “the default human society is flawed”, and it is up to us to fight against that default.

Are we the first species to overcome the challenges and obstacles inherent in reaching out to the cosmos? If so, the next 100 million years may be up to us. Can we find a way to bring other species along with us and, together, light up the galaxy?”

- David Brin -

A Revolution of Consciousness

You are in the midst of a revolution. Modern Science is now beginning to confirm what Spirituality, Philosophy, Sages, Ancient teachings and psychedelics have been saying for millennia, that the entire Universe is One and that what we think of as “reality” is just an illusion.. And the only real thing in the Universe is Consciousness…

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“If quantum mechanics hasn’t profoundly shocked you, you haven’t understood it yet.” ~ Niels Bohr

No More Trouble

♫ ~ As we made our way around the world we encountered love, hate, rich and poor, black and white, and many different religious groups and ideologies. It became very clear that as a human race we need to transcend from the darkness to the light and music is our weapon of the future. This song around the world features musicians who have seen and overcome conflict and hatred with love and perseverance. We don’t need more trouble, what we need is love. The spirit of Bob Marley always lives on. ~♫

How Giving Up Everything Can Make Your Life More Full

Excerpts, 100 Possessions How Giving Up Everything Can Make Your Life More Full
By 

“It was seven years ago and I was tired when it happened. I don’t remember what put me on tilt. I had spent too much time in one place. All the stuff I had collected was holding me down. No person needs three George Foreman Grills. Eight pairs of snowboard boots. Four old computers. That one’s got a floppy drive. Good grief. Too many old phones, burners and Ipods to count. Then a box of cassette Walkmans. An entire box. It was a junk show.

I deleted it all. Everything gone. Good bye bullshit. Have a box and get the hell out. I sold some. I burned some. I gave some away. The rest I dumped in the landfill. Finally I took a few heirlooms and buried them inside a metal box in Reno. I left myself with a toothbrush, a lighter and a passport. Everything was simple again…

My life changed when I stepped off the merry-go-round and took an inventory. It changed when I stepped back and thought about——not only what I owned——but what it meant to hold onto something.

The Cost of Carry

…Beyond the cost of purchase there is the burden of ownership. Ounces make pounds. The less I wanted, the less I needed. I also discovered that I could afford better things. And as I bought better things they began lasting longer. I stopped suffering from the constant cost of replacing goods…

Ego-Depletion

…Everything I owned could now fit into one bug-out-bag. I never had to check luggage. Without distractions burning up my bandwidth, it became easier to make decisions and form new memories. I no longer felt exhausted before noon everyday. My choices were high quality, focused on meaningful tasks…

Limits Inspire Creativity

…Creativity exploded in my life. I no longer worried about whether my work would survive the next four hundred years. I didn’t care about how it would sell. Instead I made works for friends and gave pieces to interesting strangers. As demand increased it was easy to sell my work. I no longer suffered over holding onto a piece. The work was never mine to keep. It was mine to share…

All that counts is the distinction between what you will own and what you will experience. It’s the stories that count.

…So travel light and become humble strong. Take the headphones off. Lift your head. Know what you want. Memories will etch. Experience will anchor. Opportunity will present. You will be free to dream, explore and discover…”

Full Article On High Existence

Warriors Walk Alone

“A penny bank full of butterflies
Will never cocoon into enough cash
To pay for the expectations of spectators
Gypsy haters
Wash your colorful wings in the well
Know that all your wishes
Add to our spicy bitches brew
We are who was sent to you
So, who sent you?
When the shit goes down
Will you remember which way the blue bird flew?”

“…meditate while they criticize it/burn sage for the liars who print it/turn
down the stove/only boil with natural fire/burn down their house/watch the
words melt /save the ink/write a new song/return to the ocean/leave them
to the mermaids/carry your pepper spray/wear your hooker books/tease
them/make them prove their identity/brand it to their bodies/force them to pin a star to their clothes/convert the masses/design the logo/create a real revolution

when no one’s looking
so they’ll never see us
coming…”

Source

Family Feud

“My mother is in Arizona. My mother is in Afghanistan. My mother is in Iraq. My mother is in Palestine.”

Kevin Coval in Season 1 Episode 4 of Def Poetry Jam

The Menace of the Military Mind

Excerpts, Truthdig (Emphasis, mine) – “…For the next 20 years I would go on from war zone to war zone as a foreign correspondent immersed in military culture. Repetitive rote learning and an insistence on blind obedience—similar to the approach used to train a dog—work on the battlefield. The military exerts nearly total control over the lives of its members. Its long-established hierarchy ensures that those who embrace the approved modes of behavior rise and those who do not are belittled, insulted and hazed. Many of the marks of civilian life are stripped away. Personal modes of dress, hairstyle, speech and behavior are heavily regulated. Individuality is physically and then psychologically crushed. Aggressiveness is rewarded. Compassion is demeaned. Violence is the favorite form of communication. These qualities are an asset in war; they are a disaster in civil society. 

!MLK

Homer in “The Iliad” showed his understanding of war. His heroes are not pleasant men. They are vain, imperial, filled with rage and violent. And Homer’s central character in “The Odyssey,” Odysseus, in his journey home from war must learn to shed his “hero’s heart,” to strip from himself the military attributes that served him in war but threaten to doom him off the battlefield. The qualities that serve us in war defeat us in peace.

Most institutions have a propensity to promote mediocrities, those whose primary strengths are knowing where power lies, being subservient and obsequious to the centers of power and never letting morality get in the way of one’s career. The military is the worst in this respect. In the military, whether at the Paris Island boot camp or West Point, you are trained not to think but to obey. What amazes me about the military is how stupid and bovine its senior officers are. Those with brains and the willingness to use them seem to be pushed out long before they can rise to the senior-officer ranks. The many Army generals I met over the years not only lacked the most rudimentary creativity and independence of thought but nearly always saw the press, as well as an informed public, as impinging on their love of order, regimentation, unwavering obedience to authority and single-minded use of force to solve complex problems.

So when I heard James R. Clapper Jr., a retired Air Force lieutenant general and currently the federal government’s director of national intelligence, denounce Edward Snowden and his “accomplices”—meaning journalists such as Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras—before the Senate Intelligence Committee last week I was not surprised. Clapper charged, without offering any evidence, that the Snowden disclosures had caused “profound damage” and endangered American lives. And all who have aided Snowden are, it appears, guilty of treason in Clapper’s eyes…

…The U.S. military has won the ideological war. The nation sees human and social problems as military problems. To fight terrorists Americans have become terrorists. Peace is for the weak. War is for the strong. Hypermasculinity has triumphed over empathy. We Americans speak to the world exclusively in the language of force. And those who oversee our massive security and surveillance state seek to speak to us in the same demented language. All other viewpoints are to be shut out. “In the absence of contrasting views, the very highest form of propaganda warfare can be fought: the propaganda for a definition of reality within which only certain limited viewpoints are possible,” C. Wright Mills wrote. “What is being promulgated and reinforced is the military metaphysics—the cast of mind that defines international reality as basically military.”

This is why people like James Clapper and the bloated military and security and surveillance apparatus must not have unchecked power to conduct wholesale surveillance, to carry out extraordinary renditions and to imprison Americans indefinitely as terrorists. This is why the nation, as our political system remains mired in paralysis, must stop glorifying military values. In times of turmoil the military always seems to be a good alternative. It presents the facade of order. But order in the military, as the people of Egypt are now learning again, is akin to slavery. It is the order of a prison. And that is where Clapper and his fellow generals and intelligence chiefs would like to place any citizen who dares to question their unimpeded right to turn us all into mindless recruits. They have the power to make their demented dreams a reality. And it is our task to take this power from them.” Read The (Outstanding) Article In Full Here

 

The Griefwalker

“Grief is not a feeling; grief is a skill. And the twin of grief as a skill of life, is the skill of being able to praise or to love life…which means where ever you find one authentically done, the other is close at hand. Grief…and praise of life…side by side…” – Stephen Jenkinson

I am still learning to embrace grief as a life skill. In the process, I’m beginning to understand that Western culture tends to treat grief as some huge monster to fear, to battle…to try to ‘overcome’ without getting the crap knocked out of us. We are removed from death here. People die away from us, either mentally via pain pills or physically in hospitals…it’s all the same in the end. We view – and therefore treat – death as something to be done at a distance. Stephen points out that our modern way of dying makes even our own death seem like a rumor to us. Our experiences are second-hand, removed…we try to stand just a few steps back from the actual process of dying and in doing so, we cheat ourselves out of fully experiencing death…and in turn, we dim the experience of life itself.

Continue reading

Peaceworker Sami Assad On The Power Of Non-Violence & Building A Global Identity

Sami Awad describes how non-violence empowers people to deal with injustice and oppression, and breaks down the barriers that prevent people from relating to each other.

Never Give Up -”Sami Awad is the Executive Director of Holy Land Trust. He was born December 4th 1971 in the US. His parents are both Palestinians; his father, Bishara Awad became a refugee at age nine after his father was killed in the 1948 war and the family was forced out of their home in what is now West Jerusalem. Bishara Awad is the founder of the Bethlehem Bible College in Bethlehem. Sami’s mother Salwa is from the Gaza Strip. At a young age Sami was influenced by the teaching of his uncle Mubarak Awad, the Palestinian activist who promoted nonviolent resistance to the occupation during the first Intifadah (popular uprising) and was arrested and deported for his peaceful / nonviolent activists by the Israeli government. Through working with Mubarak, Sami was introduced to great leaders and visionaries of the global nonviolence movement; from Jesus to Gandhi to King…”

“We talk about how violence creates more violence, but non-violence creates non-violence also. Our goal should be removing the wall of fear that the Israeli government and right wing has built over the years, instilling in them the notion that Palestinians want to kill all the Jews and throw them into the sea, and that the actions of the Israeli government are meant to protect them… Therefore, I say that an Israeli presence at demonstrations helps, because in my opinion the objective is not only that they take part in the activities, but share their experiences with friends and family, tell them about our activities, and try to recruit others. If we confined our work only to demonstrations we would not succeed.”

Sami Awad describes different levels of identification—religious belief, political affiliation, nationality—and explains why we need to make our identity as members of humanity a priority.

 

END:CIV – What Would You Fight For?

Based in part on Endgame, the best-selling book by Derrick Jensen, END:CIV asks: “If your homeland was invaded by aliens who cut down the forests, poisoned the water and air, and contaminated the food supply, would you resist?”

“A fierce critique of systematic violence and industrial civilization, End:Civ is not intended for garden-variety environmentalists. If you are anywhere below, say, an 8 on that sliding scale of pissed off, then this film is going to scare you…which means you should watch it.”

-Eugene Weekly

1aquote-derrick-jensen“There are very sober people talking about the possible death of entire oceans. The end of fish. If that’s not worth fighting for, what is?” Activist and author Derrick Jensen asserts that industrial civilization is murdering the planet and it must be stopped. We need to decolonize our hearts and minds. As soon as our allegiance is to the real world and not industrial capitalism, things become more clear. His books include A Language Older Than Words, The Culture of Make Believe, What We Leave Behind and Endgame.”

END:CIV- “The causes underlying the collapse of civilizations are usually traced to overuse of resources. As we write this, the world is reeling from economic chaos, peak oil, climate change, environmental degradation, and political turmoil. Every day, the headlines re-hash stories of scandal and betrayal of the public trust. We don?t have to make outraged demands for the end of the current global system – it seems to be coming apart already. 

But acts of courage, compassion and altruism abound, even in the most damaged places. By documenting the resilience of the people hit hardest by war and repression, and the heroism of those coming forward to confront the crisis head-on, END:CIV illuminates a way out of this all-consuming madness and into a saner future.

Backed by Jensen’s narrative, the film calls on us to act as if we truly love this land. The film trips along at a brisk pace, using music, archival footage, motion graphics, animation, slapstick and satire to deconstruct the global economic system, even as it implodes around us. END:CIV illustrates first-person stories of sacrifice and heroism with intense, emotionally-charged images that match Jensen’s poetic and intuitive approach. Scenes shot in the back country provide interludes of breathtaking natural beauty alongside clearcut evidence of horrific but commonplace destruction.”

BBoy For Life

via Nadus Films – “BBOY for LIFE is the story of gang life and break-dancing in Guatemala. How can someone born into a world of violence and death find hope for a better world? Risking their own lives, a growing community of dancers ban together to survive the blood stained streets of the ghetto where they live. Their bond and inspiration brings hope to a woman haunted by her past sins as she flees the very gang that she once called her family.”

“BBoy for Life is a human interest story that exposes not only the threat Guatemalans face on a day to day basis, but also the journey toward a life where peace and hope shine more brightly.” 

 

“Cheez & Gato are 2 of the best B-boy’s in all of Central America. Together, they and the Poker Crew battle in the streets and on stage to compete against other dancers who are battling to be the best in Central America.

Being a B-boy in Guatemala City carries with it a heavy burden and risk due to a plague of gangs throughout the ghettos. Gato’s brother was shot and killed by a gang for not giving the names of other Bboys in his neighborhood, including Gato’s.

Leidy is an active gang member who is only 3 days out of prison. Leidy spent 3.5 years in prison for extortion. Despite Leidy being a mother of 2 boys, she continued her destructive streak until she met the B-boy community.

BBOY for Life documents the struggles of not only break dancers but gangsters as well, specifically Leidy. Throughout the film, Leidy struggles with the implications of leaving the gang. Leidy understands what threat this would bring on not only herself, but her entire family.

Despite this threat, Leidy chooses the path of peace and digs in deeper with the B-boy community. Leidy’s son Gerald who is 10 years old desires to learn to break dance after seeing Cheez & Gato perform at a street battle. Leidy and Gerald together seek a sense of renewal through their new found friendships.” Learn More

Transfixed By Beauty

“Beauty is a dynamic event that occurs between you and something else. Beauty is thus an altered state of consciousness, an extraordinary moment of poetry and grace.”

-Imaginary Foundation

The Grandfathers And Common Humanity

 “What we do to each other as human beings can be very inhuman. This story explores that on several levels.” 

Jesse Saint searches for his identity deep in the Amazon jungle while living among the tribe that murdered his grandfather decades earlier. 

“The Grandfathers” is a motion-graphics documentary completing Jim Hanon’s inspiring trilogy that started with “Beyond the Gates of Splendor” and was followed by “End of the Spear.” These films were produced by Mart Green. Jesse struggles to find his place in a world alive with the memories of a famous grandfather he never knew and a heroic father he could not understand.

Years spent living among the Waodani and befriending the three old men who took part in the murder teach him the healing power of dignity, respect and forgiveness. In the jungle, Jesse must confront his family’s past as he determines his own future. This documentary is a moving tribute to a young boy’s quest for significance and wholeness, and its imprint on three old men, who, unwittingly, are on a quest of their own…”

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Beyond the Gates of Splendor: The History -

Jesse’s Grandfather, Nathanael “Nate” Saint (August 30, 1923 – January 8, 1956) was an evangelical Christian missionary pilot to Ecuador who, along with four others, was killed while attempting to evangelize the Huaorani people through efforts known as Operation Auca.

Jesse’s father, Steve Saint was born in Quito, Ecuador at a mission hospital. He was the second of Nate and Marj Saint’s three children. He has an older sister, Kathy, and a younger brother, Philip. The family lived in Shell Mera, Ecuador where his father was a missionary pilot with Mission Aviation Fellowship. In 1956, his father and four other missionaries were killed by Huaorani Indians during Operation Auca, in an effort to make peaceful contact with them.

After the death of Saint’s father, the family moved to Quito where Saint attended school. It was during this time that his aunt, Rachel Saint, and Elisabeth Elliotsuccessfully made peaceful contact with the Huaorani and were living with them in the jungle. At 10 years of age, Saint first went to live with the Huaorani, staying with them during the summers. He learned about living in the jungle, and also developed relationships with many members of the tribe. In June 1965, “Babae”, as he was called by the tribe, was baptized in the Curaray River by Kimo and Dyuwi, two of his father’s killers who had since converted to Christianity.

End Of The Spear - 

“Is it possible to forgive those who have taken from you what you most love? Can a people controlled by violence and murder be transformed? Based on the true story of five missionaries killed at the hands of the world’s most violent tribe, End of the Spear proves that sometimes the greatest tragedy can be the catalyst for the most resilient hope. From director Jim Hanon and producer Mart Green, this feature film offers a fresh, sometimes raw, cinematic journey deep into the Amazon jungle and even deeper into the human condition. It weaves together the story of a bereaved son and the tribal leader who murdered this young boy’s father. As their lives intersect three decades later, painful revelations force a life-or-death decision. The choices made will heal profound wounds; transform destructive practices, and bring hope for a new life to many.”

 

Full-length -

Director Jim Hanon on Mincaye, Jesse, and Reconciliation

Jim Hanon on The Grandfathers and Common Humanity