Barcelona Squatters Occupy Buildings Taken Over By Banks

“The social acceptance of what it means to occupy an empty building belonging to a bank that has also been rescued with public money has changed. In most cases when it comes to court the judge says it’s not a crime . . . we think the law will change. It’s common sense that where people are evicted and the banks have all these buildings that are empty, with no function . . . well, if they don’t give them some kind of use, then we will find a use for them.”

Excerpts, Irish Times – “In Barcelona’s medieval Raval neighbourhood, renowned for much of the 20th century as the hub of the city’s drug, prostitution and crime underworld, a cloth with an anti-bank slogan painted on it flaps in the breeze on the facade of a renovated building in the recently gentrified Plaça del Pedró.

Inside, in a sparsely furnished one-room apartment on the third floor, a photograph taped to a wall shows a suntanned, sporty-looking blonde in a black swimsuit reclining seductively across the bow of a luxury boat. She is gazing at the camera with confidence and a touch of nonchalance, as though secure in the expectation that life will always be this good.

Tania Hidalga (39) is the pin-up girl. Today, coughing relentlessly, she sits wearily on a donated second-hand sofa and looks across at her former self of seven years ago. “Yes, that was me, that was life then,” she says softly, between gasps. “Another world, eh?”

She was once the proud owner of an apartment on the Costa Brava near Empuriabrava, one of the largest marinas in the world, but Hidalga’s comfortable life fell apart after she lost her job as an administrative assistant in 2010.

Humiliating journey


Her relationship ended – her partner owned the boat – and she was evicted last year for not paying her mortgage after her 10 months of dole entitlement ended. She describes a humiliating journey between then and now.

For eight months she lived in a homeless shelter and depended on a nearby church for handouts of groceries. Nights were spent in fear: “There were drug addicts, criminals, prostitutes all living there. But that’s not me. I’m not a criminal – I’m a worker. I want to work and earn my living.” Her physical and mental health suffered severe setbacks. Now, she says, she is starting all over again in the Raval.

Anyone looking closely at No 5 Plaça del Pedró, however, will notice something unusual. The original lock on the building’s front door has been ripped out and replaced, and each studio- apartment door bears the marks of a cutter where the lock has been changed. Hidalga is not renting this flat. She is not even supposed to be here. But in July she and three similarly homeless families, with the help of housing lobby the Platform for Mortgage Victims (Plataforma de Afectados por la Hipoteca, known as the PAH) broke into the vacant building, now owned by Caixa Banc, and took up residence.

“When we were moving in, the neighbours were all there supporting us and cheering us on – they even helped us,” says Hidalga, her eyes welling up as she proudly points out her fridge-freezer, bed and sofa, all donations from the local community…”

“…Hidalga and her new neighbours are the post-boom squatters, occupying one of 13 bank-owned properties taken over by the platform in Catalunya and used to house people who have been evicted after getting into mortgage arrears. Such occupations are illegal, acknowledges Gala Pin (32), a spokeswoman for the housing lobby, but she distinguishes this kind of takeover from typical squatter invasions.

“We are of course influenced by the squatter movement but there are two big differences: we always occupy buildings that belong to banks, or to big firms; and are always trying to negotiate with the owners in order to try to [pay] a social rent.”

The six-storey building was renovated by a property speculator who subdivided it into studios for short-term tourism rentals but who failed to get permission for the modifications. It lay empty for three years before falling into the hands of Banco de Valencia, which merged with Caixa in July.

The platform organises these occupations not as a first option but as a desperate last resort, says Pin.

Civil disobedience


“The law says it’s illegal but the platform practises civil disobedience only when there are no more alternatives. This is a tactic, a technique that has been used in the history of humanity for changing laws that were not fair. So maybe it’s illegal – but it doesn’t mean that it’s not legitimate.”

She points out that Banco de Valencia was bailed out with the help of €3 billion in public money, later supplemented by €4.5 billion from the Spanish government’s Fund for Orderly Bank Restructuring. The platform is now trying to negotiate with Caixa Banc in order to secure the occupants’ tenancy at reasonable rent..” Full Story And Another Video On Irish Times

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5 comments on “Barcelona Squatters Occupy Buildings Taken Over By Banks

  1. […] Barcelona Squatters Occupy Buildings Taken Over By Banks: here. […]

  2. Love it when things change, people are brave and free-spirited and stories sleeping stories come alive in us, in me. thanks for reporting this.

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